Biden administration moves to avoid shortages of Covid-19 monoclonal antibody treatments

The Biden administration moves to avoid shortages of COVID-19 monoclonal antibody treatments. A nurse here enters a monoclonal antibody site, August 18, at C.B. Smith Park in Pembroke Pines, Florida.

NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) - The Tennessee Department of Health is asking healthcare providers to prioritize monoclonal antibody treatments for those who are 'most likely to be hospitalized.' 

Those most likely to be hospitalized for Covid-19 are the unvaccinated, leaving those who are vaccinated with questions. The treatment has been available in Tennessee for months and has been touted by figures from the Governor, to Titans head coach Mike Vrabel. 

Monoclonal antibodies are lab-engineered immune system proteins that kickstart an immune response against an infection. The US Department of Health and Human Services says that as of September 10, 2.17 million doses of monoclonal antibodies have been shipped to all sites, and 938,000 doses have been used since December. About 43% of the distributed doses have been used as of September 3.

A spokesperson for the Tennessee Department of Health released this statement about the directive: 

"Our recommendation to monoclonal antibody providers or individual facilities across the state is if they need to prioritize distribution of the treatment, the NIH guidelines are the recommended approach for that prioritization, including prioritizing those who are most likely to be hospitalized.  Ultimately, this comes down to providers' clinical judgment to ensure those most at risk are receiving this treatment.  Providers across the state continue to receive supply of the treatment; however, we do not have an update on allocation for this week."

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